Students’ Perceptions and Attitudes upon Enrollment in an Undergraduate Hybrid Design Course

By John R. Kleinpeter.

Published by The International Journal of Learning in Higher Education

Format Price
Article: Print $US10.00
Published online: June 14, 2017 $US5.00

This article describes thirty-six undergraduate, full-time design students’ responses to a qualitative survey immediately upon enrolling in a hybrid course on the topic of visual communication for the built environment. Sixty-one percent had never taken a hybrid course and 97 percent had never taken a hybrid course in design. When asked what they liked about the online hybrid format, most noted the flexible time schedule, less commuting to campus, and working independently from any location. Several reported that the online hybrid model might affect their learning style by creating a lack of dependence on the professor and a need for independent learning from the student. Concerns about taking an online hybrid course were identified as missing deadlines in the online portion of the course, potential confusion about online assignments, using the university’s course management technology, including lack of experience with the technology, deficits with that specific software package, and lack of contact with the professor and classmates. A few identified concerns regarding registering for the hybrid course without knowledge regarding the online portion of the course. Educational implications are provided. Areas for future research are outlined.

Keywords: Hybrid Courses, Design Education, Student Satisfaction

The International Journal of Learning in Higher Education, Volume 24, Issue 2, pp.53-63. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Published online: June 14, 2017 (Article: Electronic (PDF File; 374.096KB)).

John R. Kleinpeter

Associate Professor, Department of Design, California State University Long Beach, Long Beach, California, USA